Sep
02

July 2011

Check back with us later, in the mean time keep up-to-date through our news section

Jul
01

June 2011

Check back with us later, in the mean time keep up-to-date through our news section
Apr
22

April 2011

April again was a month full of interesting articles in the various news papers, from an economical, political and climate view point.

The most interesting article was however about the immigrant who was booted out of New Zealand. For further details, follow this link for further information.

Its a very good example confirming that the various immigration instructions for permanent and temporary visas do not link with each other correctly.

According to immigration instructions, an applicant for a temporary visa requires to have a clean bill of health, the applicant needs to meet ASH (an acceptable standard of health). This was also the case with this person as he was in NZ on an approved business visa, meaning that his medicals confirmed an acceptable standard of health at that time.

When an LTBV is approved and issued, it is expected that you would lodge a residence application after having operated your business for two years and thus obtain residency. An LTBV is a much travelled pathway to residency for business people.

Medicals for residency and temporary visas have however different requirements, i.e. the medical requirements for residency have a higher threshold.

So why approve somebody for a temporary application when a logical and subsequent residence application may be declined on health grounds?  That in my view is incorrect and needs to be rectified by INZ as soon as possible. It hurts the industry, moreover, the good image and name of New Zealand as a destination.

May
13

May 2011

This month something different; a short economic review as publicised on the NZ Government website;

New Zealand’s unemployment rate fell 0.1 percentage point to 6.6 percent in the March 2011 quarter. There
were 155,000 people unemployed in seasonally adjusted terms. Employment expanded by 1.4 percent over
the quarter, driven by a four percent increase in part-time employment. Of some concern, total actual hours
worked fell by 0.9 percent. Business confidence recovered much of the confidence lost last month, following
the February earthquake. There were strong improvements in indicators around own activity outlook,
residential building construction, employment and profitability. Petrol prices remain high, although recent
downward movements in international oil prices, may result in lower prices. Households have increased their
expenditure on fuel in each of the last eight months, according to Statistics New Zealand’s electronic card
transactions survey, with expenditure rising by an additional 2.1 percent during March. The overall value of
electronic card transactions during the month rose by 0.5 percent. Food prices rose by 5.5 percent in the
March 2011 year, with the 1 October rise in rate of GST being a major contributor. The tourism industry is
under pressure (especially in the South Island) with international visitor numbers falling consistently on a
trend basis since September last year. The earthquake and associated Tsunami in Japan, along with the
flooding in Australia (two major sources of international visitors to New Zealand) has not helped, neither has
the impact of the global financial crisis on the economies of Ireland and the United Kingdom.

New Zealand’s unemployment rate fell 0.1 percentage point to 6.6 percent in the March 2011 quarter.

There were 155,000 people unemployed in seasonally adjusted terms.

Employment expanded by 1.4 percent over the quarter, driven by a four percent increase in part-time employment. Of some concern, total actual hours worked fell by 0.9 percent.

Business confidence recovered much of the confidence lost last month, following the February earthquake.

There were strong improvements in indicators around own activity outlook, residential building construction, employment and profitability.

Petrol prices remain high, although recent downward movements in international oil prices, may result in lower prices.

Households have increased their expenditure on fuel in each of the last eight months, according to Statistics New Zealand’s electronic card transactions survey, with expenditure rising by an additional 2.1 percent during March. The overall value of electronic card transactions during the month rose by 0.5 percent.

Food prices rose by 5.5 percent in the March 2011 year, with the 1 October rise in rate of GST being a major contributor.

The tourism industry is under pressure (especially in the South Island) with international visitor numbers falling consistently on a trend basis since September last year.

The earthquake and associated Tsunami in Japan, along with the flooding in Australia (two major sources of international visitors to New Zealand) has not helped, neither has the impact of the global financial crisis on the economies of Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Mar
01

March 2011

And what a month it has been!

While New Zealand was, and still is recovering from the Christchurch earthquake from 22 February 2011, Japan was hit on 11 March 2011 with a 8.9 magnitude shock said to be the biggest to have hit Japan in 140 years, rocking buildings 235 miles (380km) away in Tokyo and sparking fires.

The quake hit at 2.46pm (5.45am GMT), about 6 miles below sea level and 78 miles off the east coast. It was swiftly followed by five powerful aftershocks of up to 7.1 magnitude. The shock was so powerful it was felt as far away as Beijing.

Television footage showed a 4-metre tsunami sweeping over embankments in Sendai city, bearing cars and houses – some on fire – across farmland, before reversing course and carrying them out to sea. Japan's Public broadcaster NHK showed images of a large ship ramming into a breakwater in Kennuma city, Miyagi prefecture.

The Pacific tsunami warning centre in Hawaii said a warning was in effect for Japan, Russia, Marcus Island and the Northern Marianas. Tsunami watches have been issued for Guam, Taiwan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Hawaii and the entire western coast of the US and Canada, from the Mexican border to Chignik Bay in Alaska.

Water levels rose quickly in the coastal town of Miyako in Iwate prefecture, while vehicles, houses and buildings were swept away by the tsunami in Onahama city, Fukushima prefecture.

The quake is one of several to have struck north-east Japan this week, including one of magnitude 7.3 on Wednesday.

In 1933, a magnitude 8.1 quake in the area killed more than 3,000 people. Last year fishing facilities were damaged by a tsunami caused by a strong quake in Chile.

Japan is one of the most seismically active countries in the world, accounting for about 20% of the world's earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.

While New Zealand was, and still is recovering from the Christchurch earthquake from 22 February 2011, Japan was hit on 11 March 2011 with a 8.9 magnitude shock is said to be the biggest to have hit Japan in 140 years, rocking buildings 235 miles (380km) away in Tokyo and sparking fires..
The quake hit at 2.46pm (5.45am GMT), about 6 miles below sea level and 78 miles off the east coast. It was swiftly followed by five powerful aftershocks of up to 7.1 magnitude. In Tokyo people screamed and grabbed each other's hands as the quake struck. The shock was so powerful it was felt as far away as Beijing.
Television footage showed a 4-metre tsunami sweeping over embankments in Sendai city, bearing cars and houses – some on fire – across farmland, before reversing course and carrying them out to sea. Public broadcaster NHK showed images of a large ship ramming into a breakwater in Kennuma city, Miyagi prefecture.
The Pacific tsunami warning centre in Hawaii said a warning was in effect for Japan, Russia, Marcus Island and the Northern Marianas. Tsunami watches have been issued for Guam, Taiwan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Hawaii and the entire western coast of the US and Canada, from the Mexican border to Chignik Bay in Alaska.
Water levels rose quickly in the coastal town of Miyako in Iwate prefecture, while vehicles, houses and buildings were swept away by the tsunami in Onahama city, Fukushima prefecture.
The quake is one of several to have struck north-east Japan this week, including one of magnitude 7.3 on Wednesday.
In 1933, a magnitude 8.1 quake in the area killed more than 3,000 people. Last year fishing facilities were damaged by a tsunami caused by a strong quake in Chile.
Japan is one of the most seismically active countries in the world, accounting for about 20% of the world's earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.

Newsflash

05/12/19 - Update BMB

Details on BUSINESS applications as from today:

  • Allocation to a CO within a week
  • Decion time frame between 2 to 3 months
  • EWV applications 20% approval rate
  • Entrepreneur residence 50% approval rate

21/11/19 - Policy update, the NEW way

For more information, please click here

IPT Decisions

The quality of decisions from INZ appear to decrease! Please refer to the Annual Report from the IPT for 2017 where on average 33% of Appeals with the IPT is allowed! A news paper article in 1 NEWS NOW dated 21/02/2019 confirms that four out of every ten appeals against INZ are upheld! That is an increase from 33% to now 40% of appeals being allowed or upheld against INZ!

Licensed Adviser

Johannes Petrus (Peter) Hubertus Cornelis Hendrikx

Licensed Immigration Adviser
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